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Wound Tighter Than A… (Insert Euphemism Here)

The world in 2016 is a stressful place. There are more people, more noise, fewer resources and less time. We need help. And, it appears to have arrived in the form of natural dopamine based theanine.

Recent studies show that theanine is helpful in combating the rather common problem of nervous system wind up. Wind up means the nervous system is developing friction and creating symptoms that include anxiety, stress, lack of focus, and risk for a variety of problems, including more serious mental health issues.

Untreated, stress can affect subconscious brain perception, as well as cause multiple symptoms in large nerves, commonly referred to as jumpy or restless legs, or nerve ending pain and other uncomfortable sensations.

A variety of nutrients help nerves to stabilise and settle down. It is now clear that theanine is an excellent addition to this list.

As little as 200 mg per day of theanine has been shown to reduce anxiety and blood pressure, while boosting mood in individuals under high stress. Theanine is able to reduce nerve tension and thereby help control stress-induced overload.

The degree to which nerves are wound up during the day sets the stage for sleep problems at night. In a study of boys with ADHD, 400 mg of theanine was reported to significantly improve sleep. Sleep is invariably disrupted by wound up nerves. Any time nerves remain calmer during the day; sleep naturally begins to improve at night.

The combination of anxiety and resulting sleep problems leads to cravings for a quick fix or reward, a temporary solution to “brain pain.” Many substances may bring temporary relief, including junk food, cigarettes, alcohol, etc. This leads to addictive behavioural patterns, and really doesn’t do anyone any favours in the long run.

Intense anxiety can disrupt the brain’s subconscious stability, resulting in varying degrees of more significant mental health issues. One example is schizophrenia, or schizoaffective disorder, in which distorted perception of reality is related to excessive nerve activity. One research group conducted several studies with theanine in this patient population.

It takes time to change nerves, and nutrition is a tool that can help guide them in the right direction. Theanine now has plenty of data to support its use to help improve overexcited nerves—a common health issue for many people, especially as the pressures of stress take their toll. It is best to nip these problems in the bud, as their tendency is to get worse and place a person at greater risk for a variety of nerve and pain related issues, as well as more difficult mental health challenges.

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